Nutrition

Teen Nutrition: Potassium

🍌🍑🥦 Teen Nutrition Talk 🍅🥔🍠🌱

Why is Potassium so important?

Potassium is crucial for the function of several vital organs including the heart & kidneys. Potassium also plays a role in nerve transmission a process which occurs throughout the body consisting of a stimulation and a reaction.

How much Potassium is recommended per day for Teens?

  • Boys – 3,000 mg
  • Girls – 2,300 mg

Did you know there are many more plant- based sources of Potassium than just a banana? Here are some great sources of Potassium to include in your Teens meals!

  1. Fruit & Dried Fruit: Apricots, prunes, raisins, oranges & bananas
  2. Vegetables: acorn squash, potatoes, spinach, tomatoes & broccoli
  3. Beans & Legumes: Lentils, kidney beans, soybeans & nuts

Does your Teen like any of these foods?

Which items do you think you can add more of?

Source: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Potassium-Consumer/

Teen Nutrition: Vitamin C

Teen Nutrition Talk 
🍓🍊🍋🥭🥝🥦🥔🥬

Vitamin C has so many important roles in the human body!

  1. Antioxidant: Protects against free radical cell damage
  2. Wound healing: Makes the protein collagen wound repair
  3. Boosts Immune Function
  4. Increases absorption of plant-based iron

Daily Recommended Amount

  • Teen Boys: 75mg
  • Teen Girls: 65mg 

Great Food Sources to Provide Vitamin C for your Teen!

  1. Citrus Fruits: oranges, grapefruit
  2. Other Fruits: kiwi, mango, strawberries, cantaloupe,
  3. Vegetables: red & green bell peppers, tomatoes, green leafy vegetables, broccoli
  4. Beverages Fortified with Vitamin C- Check the nutrition panel to make sure Vitamin C was added!

Don’t Forget- Prolonged cooking and storage often decreases Vitamin C content. Eat these items raw, microwave or steam to receive the most Vitamin C! 

https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminC-Consumer/

 

Teen Nutrition: Zinc

Todays Teen Nutrition Talk 🤩🌱🧠💪

Is your child between the ages of 13 and 19 years old?
If you answered YES, this post is for YOU!

Zinc is one of the top 10 essential nutrients for teens! 

Zinc is necessary for proper growth & organ development. 
Zinc is also critical for optimal immune function.

Recommended Amounts 
Teen Boys- 11mg daily 
Teen Girls- 9mg daily

Include more of these Zinc-Hearty Sources in your teens diet to ensure recommended amounts are reached.

  1. BEANS & LEGUMES: baked beans (2.9mg per serving), chickpeas (1.3mg per serving), kidney beans (0.9mg per serving), peas (0.5mg per serving)
  2. NUTS & SEEDS: pumpkin seeds (2.2mg per serving), cashews (1.6mg per serving), almonds (0.9mg per serving)
  3. WHOLE GRAINS: oatmeal (1.1mg per serving)
  4. FORTIFIED BREAKFAST CEREALS
  5. SEAFOOD- oysters provide the greatest amount of zinc (74mg per serving). Crab (6.5mg per serving) and lobster (3.4mg per serving) are also good sources of zinc. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Zinc-Consumer/#h3
This is the second post in our series on the Top 10 Nutrients for Teens. You can read the first post here.
If you would like to learn more about our services or have a family meal plan created with you and your children in mind, contact our team at fitness@retreatpvb.com!

Top 10 Nutrients for Teens

Lets talk Teen Nutrition 🍎🥦

This essential period of growth requires key nutrients for your child to reach their optimal status of mental and physical functioning!  

Do you know the top 10 Nutrients for Teens?!

In no specific order…

  1. Calcium
  2. Iron
  3. Zinc
  4. Vitamin D
  5. Potassium
  6. Vitamin C
  7. Fiber
  8. Protein
  9. Carbohydrates
  10. Unsaturated Fat

Nutrition is important during adolescence for growth and development! 🥑🍒🌱

Follow along as we discuss each of these important nutrients for adolescents!

Starting off with Calcium

Teens need Calcium for bone growth & development!🦴

Here are some AWESOME plant-based calcium sources to ensure your teen is getting enough🥬 🥜🥛🥗

  • -SEEDS: sesame, celery & chia seeds (also provide omega 3 fatty acids which help reduce inflammation)
  • -BEANS: most beans have some calcium! Beans providing the most calcium include wing beans (24% of RDI) & white beans (13% of RDI). (Beans & lentils are also high in fiber, protein & provide iron, zinc, potassium, magnesium & folate).
  • -ALMONDS: provide 8% of calcium RDI. (Also provide protein, fiber, vitamin E, magnesium, manganese & omega 3 fatty acids).
  • -DARK GREEN LEAFY VEGGIES: Broccoli, kale, spinach, collard greens & rhubarb
  • -FORTIFIED FOODS: (this just means processed foods, in which calcium has been added). This includes breads, tortilla, crackers & cereals. Make sure to read the nutrition panel & ingredients list! These products may be high in sugars, oils & preservatives.
  • -SOY & EDAMAME: Tofu provides 86% of calcium RDI & Edamame provides 10% of calcium RDI. (These are also high in protein and folate).
  • -FORTIFIED DRINKS: Non- dairy milk such as almond or soy milk. Soy milk usually provides the greatest amount of calcium at 30% of RDI. Also, fortified orange juice can provide up to 50% of calcium RDI.
  • -FIGS: Provide 5% of calcium RDI. (Also high in fiber, antioxidants, potassium & vitamin K). 

https://youngwomenshealth.org/2013/10/17/calcium/

*RDI is the Recommended Daily Intake

Mindful Eating

A Mindful Approach to Eating: Week 3

The Retreat at Ponte Vedra Beach is committed to helping individuals and families develop the tools for living every day more satisfied. We know that happiness is connected to finding a rhythm to life that makes sense and is sustainable.

Today, most people are focused on reducing or restricting their caloric intake in America. Americans are discontent with their health and their bodies. They eat on the go, eat food prepared by others, and they eat alone or while multitasking much more than they would like.  Most importantly, they’ve become disconnected from the ingredients in their food. When we put these factors together, they have put their bodies at a disadvantage and taken away its ability to auto regulate.

If you are generally unsatisfied with your relationship with food and eating, then developing a broader appreciation for how your food was grown, harvested, processed and packaged may be the next step. Being aware of how the food came to your plate is important.

These things sound simple, and much of it is common sense, but there are good reasons we ignore our relationship with food. 

Change is hard.

We are comfortable with our habits and anything new takes more time and energy, even when we are motivated. We settle into familiar patterns for which there are proven outcomes–we already know the results for how we have been living.  Happy or not with those results, living with the status quo seems easier than taking a chance on something unknown. Experimenting with something new opens up the possibility of failure. We are very motivated to avoid feeling like we have failed.

This brings me to my next point.

There is so much information about how you should eat, what you should eat, and when you should eat that it’s difficult to know what’s really useful. The potential for your investment into a plan that is not effective gives short-lived results or leaves you with consequences to your overall health, which is a fear everyone has. People are tired of food trends and buying supplements that, as a nation, have not made us healthier and happier.

Diets that eliminate food groups or strictly reduce calories leave people feeling resentful, unsatisfied, and generally do not lead to long-term health outcomes. Additionally, it can be counterproductive to move towards a category of eating that is judgmental or judged as extreme by others.

Mindfulness is an approach to eating that moves beyond a “diet plan” and offers opportunity to recalibrate our appetite. Here is a summary of the tips from this series including two new ones for this week:

      Try implementing the following tips this week:

      1. Let your body guide your eating.

      Hunger is an important cue.  So is satiety. It takes your body about 20 minutes to feel full during a meal.  If meal time is shorter, the signal will be missed and overeating will happen. When pressed for time, consider eating a replica (in size and content) of a healthful meal that fills you up and keeps you satisfied.  Eating calorie dense foods quickly tricks your mind into thinking you need much more of it than you do.  It may take some time for your stomach and your brain to start communicating effectively again, but it will happen if you keep up these tips.

      2. Make mealtime a sensory experience.

      Take time to really chew your food, breaking it down to a consistency where the flavor comes through.  This is also great for digestion! Food that is appealing to the eye and smells appetizing sets the tone for a fulfilling meal. The texture, temperature, combinations of flavors are pieces of information that help you feel more satisfied with the food you are eating.  The more senses used to take in the meal, the more meaningful it will be. We are less likely to eat too much and we are more likely to make wise choices.

      3. Share your meal with someone, someone you like, if possible.  

      Good conversation, stimulating ideas, shared enjoyment makes food more memorable and meets your need for sustenance in ways that can’t come for food.  Humans need connection: it fills us with positive emotions. Isolations is much more likely to lead to overeating.

      4. Choose nutritionally rich food that are sustainable.

      Eating a diet high in a variety of nutrients provides more energy, keeps away cravings, and supports health. There is a great deal of misinformation about where nutrients come from and how much we actually need. Dr. Fuhrman published a handy guide, “Nutritarian Handbook and ANDI Food Scoring Guide,” with rankings of the most nutritious foods.  You guessed it, the most nutritious foods are all green! When available, buy local and seasonal food. It will taste better and drastically reduce the carbon footprint.

      5. Eat and only eat at mealtimes.

      Other than good conversation, try not to multitask during meals.  When your attention is on something else, you are not registering what you eat.  Your getting the gist of it now, this leads to eating more food, eating less well, and disconnects your mind from your gut.  

      6. Eat at specific, scheduled meal times.  

      Help your body get on a schedule to manage hunger and regulate your digestion.  Setting aside a time to eat also sends you the message that nourishing yourself is a worthwhile effort.  Putting sometime and some thought into preparation or presentation will pay off. When you create something, you cherish it.  Your loved ones also get the message that you believe nourishing them is important. Not many more gestures help the parent-child relationship more than this one.  

      I cannot encourage this step more strongly as a physician and as a child-psychiatrist. If you are only able to implement one step, this is the one. This does not mean you must be a gourmet.  Many semi-prepared options or even take out options are healthful and if served on plates, even paper plates, at the table, this will do the trick.

      Theresa Randazzo-Burton, MD
      Child, Adolescent, and Adult Psychiatrist

      Mindful Eating

      A Mindful Approach to Eating: Week 2

      The Retreat at Ponte Vedra Beach is committed to helping individuals and families develop the tools for living every day more satisfied. We know that happiness is connected to finding a rhythm to life that makes sense and is sustainable.

      As we have come to associate what we eat with who we are, we have become more dissociated from how we are eating and the actual food by which we are nourished. It’s easy to understand how this could have happened when we think about how quickly food went from being scarce to being in overabundance. It’s pretty simple to fill a plate with calorie-dense foods for most Americans today, but this was not something most of our great grandparents could say.

      As a nation, we simply have not had time to adapt our relationship with food as our identity has shifted. Today, in a world where we can grow or import anything from anywhere (at least for the time being), it seems that what we are missing out on the practice of thinking about how we are feeding our appetites.

      So, let’s step back and take a look at process rather than content.

      This is mindful eating.

      Start to think about how you eat. 

      Take a moment to note what comes to mind when you ask yourself this question:

      “How do I eat?”

      Common answers are:

      “Whenever I can”

      “On the go”

      “Whatever’s in the lunch line”

      “Fast”

      “Alone”

      “Between shifts”

      “While watching TV”

      It’s likely that some of the above answers might resonate with you, these factors have a significant impact on your health and wellbeing and are key to the success of whatever approach to eating you take or strategy you have for nourishing your body. 

      Mindful eating, in its simplest form, is turning some (or all) of your attention to the meal at hand with the goal of fully understanding and engaging in the experience.

      Core Ideas of Mindful Eating:

      • Let your body rather than your emotions guide your eating
      • Stay aware of your sensory experiences while eating
      • Share the experience with others
      • Choose nutritionally rich and sustainable foods
      • Focus on eating only while you are actually eating
      • Carve out specific times for meals.

        Try implementing this tip this week:

        Make mealtime a sensory experience.

        Take time to really chew your food, breaking it down to a consistency where the flavor comes through.  This is also great for digestion!

        Food that is appealing to the eye and smells appetizing sets the tone for a fulfilling meal. The texture, temperature, combinations of flavors are pieces of information that help you feel more satisfied with the food you are eating.  

        The more senses used to take in the meal, the more meaningful it will be. We are less likely to eat too much and we are more likely to make wise choices.

        Share your meal with someone, someone you like, if possible.  

        Good conversation, stimulating ideas, shared enjoyment makes food more memorable and meets your need for sustenance in ways that can’t come for food.  Humans need connection: it fills us with positive emotions. Isolations is much more likely to lead to overeating.

        Theresa Randazzo-Burton, MD
        Child, Adolescent, and Adult Psychiatrist

        Mindful Eating

        A Mindful Approach to Eating: Week 1

        The Retreat at Ponte Vedra Beach is committed to helping individuals and families develop the tools for living every day more satisfied. We know that happiness is connected to finding a rhythm to life that makes sense and is sustainable.

        Despite the fact that a relationship with food is a part of both our daily routine and deeply ingrained individual and family traditions, it remains an aspect over which very few people feel that they have mastery. There are many reasons for this, but in my opinion, one of the major problems is that there is just too much advice available about what we should be eating that it’s impossible to make sense of it all. The importance of a healthy diet for physical and emotional wellbeing is not in dispute, but knowing what to do or who to believe is much less clear. The confusion created by all the information available is not to the advantage of the individual.

        This flood of information is in response to the demand and people’s willingness to allot a significant amount of resources in attempts to master how they nourish their body.  There are so many conversations going on about what to eat and how to eat: paleo versus vegan, low glycemic versus starch based, six small meals a day versus intermittent fasting, juices versus bowls, fish versus mercury. The list goes on and on. Sorting through all this is overwhelming and leaves people feeling like they are missing the key to achieving their goals.

        Mindfulness is an approach to eating that moves beyond a “diet plan” and offers opportunity to recalibrate our appetite.

        There is so much information about how you should eat, what you should eat, and when you should eat that it’s difficult to know what’s really useful. The potential for your investment into a plan that is not effective gives short-lived results or leaves you with consequences to your overall health, which is a fear everyone has. People are tired of food trends and buying supplements that, as a nation, have not made us healthier and happier.

        Diets that eliminate food groups or strictly reduce calories leave people feeling resentful, unsatisfied, and generally do not lead to long-term health outcomes. Additionally, it can be counterproductive to move towards a category of eating that is judgmental or judged as extreme by others.

          Try implementing this tip this week:

          -Let your body guide your eating.

          Hunger is an important cue.  So is satiety.

          It takes your body about 20 minutes to feel full during a meal. It meal time is shorter, the signal will be missed and overeating will happen.  

          When pressed for time, consider eating a replica (in size and content) of a healthful meal you like, that fills you up and keeps you satisfied.

          Eating calorie dense foods quickly tricks your mind into thinking you need much more of it than you do.  You also get a huge mental reward (similar to sex or winning) when you eat foods high in fat. This makes it a very seductive option at the moment you want a quick boost in mood.

          This is also what makes it risky to use food as a reward for children. It does not take long for this phenomenon to become a craving.  This pattern sets you up to repeatedly turn to food for emotional reasons rather than in response to hunger that comes from your belly.

          It may take some time for your stomach and your brain to start communicating effectively again, but it will happen if you keep up the tips discussed in this series! 

          Theresa Randazzo-Burton, MD
          Child, Adolescent, and Adult Psychiatrist

          Family at Beach

          Happy Healthy American Families

          Families are managing a lot of different things in 2018. There are work schedules, school schedules, after school schedules, medical appointments, play dates, and a variety of other things that can pop up on a family calendar from week to week. At the Retreat at Ponte Vedra Beach, we are creating a place for families to come and enjoy time together whether it is for a class, appointment, or family event. We know that family health and wellness increases when intentional time is spent together and positive memories are made.

          In America, a lot of money is spent on our health care. According to the Center for Disease Control, the per person cost for health care is around $9,990.  For perspective on what this cost was a few decades ago, in the 1960’s the per person cost was for health care was $146. This cost has been increasing every decade since the 1960’s. Not many people get excited talking about money or budgeting. It is important; however, to have these conversations from time to time so that we can identify opportunity for improvement. America currently spends about 17.8% of our total budget on health care costs while in 1960 we were spending about 5% of our total budget on health care costs. Finding ways to keep this number from continuing to increase will benefit individuals, families, and our country as a whole.

          The current American culture is very different from the culture of the 1960’s. Some of the changes include an increase in access to fast food restaurants, changes in the the way food is made, and increase in drinking sugary and caffeinated beverages.  We are exposed to a lot of messages about food and fitness. It gets confusing! Many of the current trends, habits, and lifestyles are not leading to a healthier America. The marketing of many food companies and fitness programs is very convincing: what they have is something you need! Most of us have a diet or fitness trend that pops into our mind when we think about health and wellness. How do we sort through all the different messages about health and wellness when it seems there is a new diet or lifestyle to follow every month?

          We have the opportunity to shape children and adolescents dietary preferences and lifestyle routines while they are living in our homes. Did you know a lot of children have difficulty identifying different fruits and veggies? The youngest among us are growing up in homes without consistent exposure to food in its natural form. Being in the kitchen, cooking, and creating is a wonderful opportunity for children and parents to enjoy time together while increasing their health and wellness.

          Creating a home that is filled with health promoting foods and activities takes the fear and guesswork out of meeting your own personal needs and the needs of your children. A few things you can try are listed below:

          • Take an inventory of what’s in your pantry and refrigerator
          • Schedule time for meal planning
          • Have your kids contribute ideas for snacks and meals
          • Introduce new foods one at a time, try and pair them with an old favorite
            • Steamed broccoli with mashed potatoes
            • Carrots  with hummus
          • Schedule time for grocery shopping
          • Schedule time for meal prepping. This includes washing, cutting, and pre-measuring meal ingredients so that when you want to make something it takes less work!
          • Include children and adolescents in meal prep
            • Research shows that children and adolescents are more likely to eat something they have helped prepare
          • Have a family meeting to review what’s working
          • Plan re-peat meals! You don’t have to create all new meals each week

          At the Retreat at Ponte Vedra Beach, we seek to have open conversations about health, nutrition, wellness, and fitness. We focus on supportive do-able solutions! Children and adults are faced with daily decisions and opportunities to nourish their bodies and minds. By learning patterns that are enjoyable and health promoting, individuals and families are creating healthy habits with lifelong benefits.  Follow our blog for more posts in this series on nutrition and wellness. Look for future posts on family friendly meals, navigating nutrition labels, lunch box solutions, travel friendly snack packs, and more! Join us for exciting events this fall including meal planning, taste testing, sauces and dressing your kids will love, batch cooking, and of course, holiday baking!

          Center for Disease Control. (2017). National center for health statistics. Health, United States, 2016: With chartbook on long-term trends in health. Retrieved from: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus16.pdf#093